Colorado River

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April 10, 2016--Colorado River runoff forecast keeps dropping (Arizona Daily Star)

Drought continues to put the squeeze on the Southwest’s water supplies, with Colorado River runoff forecasts declining for the second straight month. The April-July forecast for Colorado River runoff into Lake Powell is 74 percent of average, down from 80 percent in early March.


March 29, 2016--Difficulties arise in efforts to save water for Powell (Post Independent)

A recent Bureau of Reclamation report projects that Western river basins, including the Colorado Basin, are likely to experience a 7-27 percent decline in spring streamflows during this century. The bureau’s 2016 SECURE Water Act Report to Congress, which can be found at 


March 23, 2016--Colorado bird health an indicator of water quality for humans (Daily Summit)

The growing water issues and shortages throughout the western United States stand as a notable threat to the way of life for millions of Americans but could also pose just as significant a hazard for hundreds of native species of birds. Tuesday marked World Water Day, an observance by the United Nations of water issues impacting the world over that dates to the early- ’90s in order t


March 16, 2016--Pueblo board approves plan to leave some of its water on Western Slope as part of study (Pueblo Chieftain)

A contract for a pilot program that would leave some of Pueblo’s water on the Western Slope was approved Tuesday by the Pueblo Board of Water Works. Pueblo Water will leave 200 acre-feet (65 million gallons) of water from the Ewing Ditch for a fee of about $134,000 as part of an $11 million pilot project to test tools to manage drought in the Colorado River ba


March 15, 2016--Lake Powell tied at the turbines to ski lifts (Mountain Town News)

Just how much more water can be drawn from the rivers that originate near Winter Park, Breckenridge, and Aspen, as well as Crested Butte, Telluride, and Durango, before the electrical supply powering the ski lifts gets wobbly? That sounds a bit like a zen koan, but in fact, it’s at the heart of a discussion now underway in Colorado.


March 14, 2016--East slope water officials join west slope water study (Aspen Daily News)

A big question in Colorado is how much water is left to divert and use from the Colorado River before levels drop too low in Lake Powell to make hydropower and deliver water downstream.


March 11, 2016--Despite state water plan, local headwaters have growing claims (Summit Daily)

The battle over water is moving to a boil. Colorado unveiled a statewide water plan this past November to better prepare for an estimated doubling of its population by the year 2050, from about 5 million to an estimated 10.5 million.


March 10, 2016--El Nino and the Colorado (Boulder Weekly)

Water levels and rainfall for the Colorado River basin were below-average in January and February, and will remain so until at least July 2016, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The basin is at only 61 percent of its seasonal average. Likewise, inflow into Lake Powell and Lake Mead is also below the seasonal average.


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