Colorado River

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


July 19, 2014--Water rationing for farmers? It's on the horizon (Arizona Central)

Regional water planners last month made a prediction that will likely be a game-changer for Arizona's economy, revealing just how water scarcity will restructure the future of our food security. As early as 2017, drought in the Lower Colorado River's watershed could lead to irrigation rationing for central Arizona agriculture.


July 18, 2014--New report recommends effective water solutions in CO River Basin (Water World)

American Rivers and Western Resource Advocates -- two authorities on Western water issues -- issued a new report that identifies conservation, reuse and other innovative solutions that could eliminate Western water shortages stemming from the over-stressed Colorado River.


July 14, 2014--The water-energy nexus could become a collision in a warming world (High Country News)

If you thought fracking was a water-guzzling and violent way to get the oil and gas flowing from shale, then you should check out oil shale* retorting. Earlier this month, details were made public regarding an oil shale project Chevron proposes for western Colorado. Of particular note was the amount of energy and water it will take to produce 100,000 barrels of oil per day.


July 14, 2014--The past and future of California's water (Scientific American)

The 20th century dawned with both excitement and concern for the water future of California and the rapidly growing but arid American West. Gold fever was receding, urban populations were burgeoning, and tentative efforts at modern, irrigated agriculture were expanding.


July 12, 2014--Lake Mead watch: At lowest levels since 1937 (High Country News)

For almost two decades, the white band of mineral deposits circling Arizona’s Lake Mead like a bathtub ring, has grown steadily taller, a sign that America’s largest manmade water source is in deep trouble. This week it fell to its lowest level since 1937, when Hoover Dam was completed and the reservoir filled.


July 12, 2014--West-Slope Colorado towns restore local flows, even as thirsty front-range lawns drink from their rivers (National Geographic)

When residents in Denver, Colorado Springs and other cities on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains turn on their sprinklers to irrigate lawns, they rarely think about the fate of fish in the headwaters of the Colorado River on the other side of the Continental Divide.


July 10, 2014--5 Tribal land and water rights bills get SCIA attention (Indian Country)

Seeking to hear directly from tribal leaders on the important issue of land and water rights, Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Chairman Jon Tester (D-Mont.) held a hearing on five bills that would strengthen tribal land and water rights and increase economic development on tribal lands July 9.


July 10, 2014--Western Slope counties look to protect water resources (Summit Daily)

“No more water across the Divide” is the rallying cry of the Colorado Basin Implementation Plan. The second draft of the plan was released July 1, and over and over it calls for a stop to diversions of water from the Colorado River Basin under the Continental Divide.


July 9, 2014--Water plan would weigh new diversion projects (Post Independent)

Though Colorado River Basin water users strongly urge against any new trans-mountain diversions to the East Slope as part of a draft plan for the basin released last week, a key part of the process to create a state water plan recognizes a need to eventually have that discussion.


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