Colorado River

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


September 17, 2016--Colorado River faces flood of challenges (Post Independent)

The common denominator among speakers at the Colorado River District’s annual seminar Friday was that stakeholders have an uphill battle to protect the river.


September 12, 2016--When do we stop calling what’s happening on the Colorado River “shortage”? (Ink Stain)

Putting together a lecture for University of New Mexico Water Resources Program students tomorrow, I’ve been thinking about this quote from MWD’s Bill Hasencamp, in last week’s LA Times:


September 7, 2016--The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety (Los Angeles Times)

A reckoning arrives every August for the Colorado River and the 40 million people across the West who depend on it. After water managers measure annual inflows and outflows and do their best to estimate future precipitation in places as far-flung as northwestern Wyoming and southwestern New Mexico, they make a pronouncement that once was arcane but has become increasingly prominent —


September 5, 2016--Fed's back off from Lake Mead water demand (Tucson.com)

It sounded too good to be true — an official forecast that 2016 water use in Arizona, California and Nevada will be the lowest since 1992. That forecast from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation was too good to be true — by the bureau’s own admission. It was widely reported recently as a sign of major progress toward conservation.


August 25, 2016--New documentary offers a sharp look at the West’s water crisis (High Country News)

In 1922, seven Western states agreed to divvy up the water in the Colorado River, paving the way for giant dams, reservoirs and aqueducts to move and store it.


August 23, 2016--The Colorado River conveys as much politics as it does water (ydr.com)

Water.  We harness its power from mighty rivers.  We experience its wrath in the form of hurricanes and tsunamis.  We enjoy it for recreation.  We rely on daily intake of water for our very existence.  Water can be the flashpoint for contentious political battles, local conflicts, and even war. On the Colorado River, our nation’s largest reservoir has dr


August 20, 2016--“Climate change is water change” — why the Colorado River system is headed for trouble (Washington Post)

There’s good news and bad news for the drought-stricken Colorado River system, according to projections just released in a new federal report from the Bureau of Reclamation, manager of dams, powerplants and canals. The report predicts that Lake Mead — the river system’s largest reservoir, supplying water to millions of people in Nevada, Arizona, C


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