Colorado River

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The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


July 27, 2016--The Colorado River’s unexpected carbon footprint (High Country News)

When water rushed over the dry riverbed of the Colorado River Delta for the first time in two decades, thousands of bubbles popped up in the sand. Alongside the bank, a group of scientists stood in awe, theorizing that oxygen and nitrogentrapped in the sediment were the cause.


July 25, 2016--Snow, runoff and the Colorado River Basin (Mountain Town News)

From his office in Glenwood Springs overlooking the Colorado River, Eric Kuhn has become one of the West’s most prominent thinkers about the intersection of water, climate change, and allocations for farms, factories and cities, including ski towns. He joined the Colorado River Water Conservation District as an engineer after working in the private sector as a nuclear engin


July 21, 2016--Groundwater discharge to Upper Colorado River Basin varies in response to drought (USGS)

The Colorado River and its tributaries provide water to more than 40 million people in seven states, irrigate more than 5.5 million acres of land, and support hydropower facilities. More than half of the total streamflow in the UCRB originates from groundwater.


July 21, 2016--Arizona earns federal assurances on Lake Mead water (Tucson.com)

For now, water that Arizona and two other Lower Colorado River Basin states store in Lake Mead is safe from another state’s clutches, the Interior Department says. The commitment, contained in a letter that Deputy Interior Secretary Michael Connor wrote this week, protects this water only through 2016.


July 9, 2016--Floating solar is a win-win energy solution for drought-stricken US lakes (Guardian)

The Colorado River’s two great reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, are in retreat. Multi-year droughts and chronic overuse have taken their toll, to be sure, but vast quantities of water are also lost to evaporation.


July 8, 2016--Hickenlooper backs $380 million Denver Water project to divert Colorado River water (Denver Water)

Colorado leaders on Wednesday formally backed Denver Water’s $380 million project to nearly triple the capacity of a Front Range reservoir and divert more water from the Colorado River Basin. Denver Water’s Moffat expansion project, 13 years in the making, “aligns with the key elements of Colorado’s Water Plan,” Gov.


June 21, 2016--Study finds surprising source of Colorado River water supply (Cortez Journal)

Every spring, snow begins to melt throughout the Rocky Mountains, flowing down from high peaks and into the streams and rivers that form the mighty Colorado River Basin, sustaining entire cities and ecosystems from Wyoming to Arizona.


June 20, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


June 19, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


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