Colorado River

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


February 10, 2016--Drying out of the American Southwest (Mountain Town News)

Peering through a window on a flight from Denver to Los Angeles, you first see the Rocky Mountains, rich with forests and snow, here and there a ski area. Then, for the majority of the trip you see aridity, the soft greens of sagebrush steppes at higher elevations dissolving to harsh pigments of the Mojave Desert until you get to the exurbs of LA. This is the American Southwest.


February 5, 2016--The right to waste water: In the west, water users forced to use it or lose it (Pro Publica)

High in the Rocky Mountains, snowmelt fills a stream that trickles down into Ohio Creek and then onward toward the Upper Gunnison River.


January 11, 2016--Department of the Interior proposes adaptive management framework for Glen Canyon Dam (St. George News)

The U.S. Department of the Interior released a proposed framework Friday for adaptively managing Glen Canyon Dam over the next 20 years with the goal of creating certainty and predictability for power and water users while protecting environmental and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and the Colorado River ecosystem.


New Colorado River Website

According to a new U.S. Interior Department website (www.doi.gov/water/owdi.cr.drought/en/index.html), the Colorado River and its tributaries:

-  Are directly linked to nine National Parks and seven National Wildlife Refuges, which support over $1 billion in tourism revenue each year.


January 6, 2016--Is the Rio Grande headed for “permanent drought”? (New Mexico In-Depth)

In the mad rush to get a jump on holiday vacation, readers probably missed the release of an important paper on water and climate change in the West. But don’t worry.


January 4, 2016--Report: Lake Mead dropping 12 feet per year (Rocky Mountain PBS)

The math is simple. So states a disarming truism in a new report from the Colorado River Research Group, formed of water scholars in four states, “an independent, scientific voice for the future of the Colorado River.” In 2007, the U.S.


January 2, 2016--Troubled Colorado River gets new website (Arizona Daily Star)

The Colorado River is essential for life in the Southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico.


WIP’s Participating Entity, SWCD, Update

At their December 9th Board meeting the following grants were funded by the Southwestern Water Conservation District (SWCD):

-   Dolores Water Conservancy District (DWCD) and Montezuma Valley Irrigation Company (MVIC): The DWCD and MVIC requested a $25,000 SWCD grant in support of an initiative of the two water boards and counties for a redraft by David Robbins of Hill and Robbins, P.C. of the proposed National Conservation Area (NCA) legislation on the lower Dolores River as an alternative to current Wild and Scenic Suitability from McPhee Dam to Bedrock. A total of $25,000 will be raised from DWCD, MVIC, as well as Montezuma, Dolores, San Miguel, and Montrose counties.
-  Study to Determine Potential Colorado River Call Impacts to West Slope: At the December 18, 2014 meeting of the Four West Slope Basin Roundtables held at Ute Water in Grand Junction, various attendees cited the need for technical data so that the Four Roundtables could better discuss issues surrounding future Colorado River development and the risk to current water users. This also came up for each Basin Implementation Plan, and as part of the IBCC conceptual agreement for transmountain diversions. The River District would like SWCD to join in their request to the Four Roundtables to support technical data development by the two Districts. The purpose is to create a common platform to have fruitful discussions on the West Slope regarding Colorado River development. SWCD was asked to contribute $10,000 to this study, along with $10,000 from the River District, and $8,000 from each West Slope Roundtables for a total of $52,000 in funding. 


Syndicate content