Colorado River

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


August 20, 2016--“Climate change is water change” — why the Colorado River system is headed for trouble (Washington Post)

There’s good news and bad news for the drought-stricken Colorado River system, according to projections just released in a new federal report from the Bureau of Reclamation, manager of dams, powerplants and canals. The report predicts that Lake Mead — the river system’s largest reservoir, supplying water to millions of people in Nevada, Arizona, C


August 1, 2016--Minimal impacts from loss of Powell power, canyon institute says (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A group that wants to see the restoration of Glen Canyon and draining of Lake Powell says a new study shows such actions would have minimal impacts from the resulting loss of hydropower. The Glen Canyon Institute says the study it commissioned found there would be negligible impact on the western power grid and electric rates would go up by an average of 8 cents per month for


July 31, 2016--Killing the Colorado: Documentary addresses river water (Hava Sun News)

The Colorado River never captured the American imagination like its sister, the mighty Mississippi. While the Mississippi brings to mind images of steamboats, rustic charm and Mark Twain, the Colorado is all business. The Colorado River isn’t romanticized, but it is vital to the West – and according to a new Discovery Channel documentary, it is dying.


July 28, 2016--Colorado River Lower Basin water users leaving nearly 500,000 acre feet in Lake Mead this year (InkStain)

Colorado River water use in Arizona, Nevada, and California this year is currently forecast at 7.006 million acre feet (source:pdf), well below the three states’ nominal legal entitlement of 7.5 mill


July 27, 2016--The Colorado River’s unexpected carbon footprint (High Country News)

When water rushed over the dry riverbed of the Colorado River Delta for the first time in two decades, thousands of bubbles popped up in the sand. Alongside the bank, a group of scientists stood in awe, theorizing that oxygen and nitrogentrapped in the sediment were the cause.


July 25, 2016--Snow, runoff and the Colorado River Basin (Mountain Town News)

From his office in Glenwood Springs overlooking the Colorado River, Eric Kuhn has become one of the West’s most prominent thinkers about the intersection of water, climate change, and allocations for farms, factories and cities, including ski towns. He joined the Colorado River Water Conservation District as an engineer after working in the private sector as a nuclear engin


July 21, 2016--Groundwater discharge to Upper Colorado River Basin varies in response to drought (USGS)

The Colorado River and its tributaries provide water to more than 40 million people in seven states, irrigate more than 5.5 million acres of land, and support hydropower facilities. More than half of the total streamflow in the UCRB originates from groundwater.


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