Colorado

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


April 22, 2014--McPhee boat check could lose funding (Cortez Journal)

The invasive quagga and zebra mussels have not been detected in McPhee Reservoir, but they’re causing havoc in nearby Lake Powell. Boat inspections at McPhee have been effective in keeping the pests out of local waters so far. However, with shrinking budgets for Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Services, the critical checkpoints have an uncertain future.


April 22, 2014--Silverton flirting with Superfund? (Durango Herald)

For years, the Environmental Protection Agency has tried to designate parts of Silverton a Superfund site. Yet for years, many locals have considered the word “Superfund” dirtier than Cement Creek. But tonight, the EPA is going to explain that word – and the years-long cleanup process a Superfund designation might entail – to San Juan County commissioners.


April 22, 2014--Has Durango sold its river, and its soul, to recreation? (High Country News)

Oxbow Preserve consists of 44 acres of land just north of Durango--population 15,000 people. The City acquired the land from private owners back in 2012 with the help of $400,000 in statewide lottery funds that are doled out for such things.


April 21, 2014--Bark beetles change Rocky Mountain stream flows, affect water quality (National Science Foundation)

Trees in mountains across the western United States are dying, thanks to an infestation of bark beetles that reproduce in the trees' inner bark. Some species of the beetles, such as the mountain pine beetle, attack and kill live trees. Others live in dead, weakened or dying hosts.


April 20, 2014--Durango’s new whitewater park opened Friday for the season (Durango Herald)

Boaters and kayakers took their first runs through Durango’s new Whitewater Park on Friday. The $1 million project created a number of in-river features next to Santa Rita Park. The contractor is continuing to do work along the shoreline, which is not accessible adjacent to the wastewater-treatment plant.


April 19, 2014--Let economic sense flow as part of Colorado’s water plan (Denver Business Journal)

Healthy rivers are essential to Colorado’s multibillion-dollar agriculture, recreational, tourism and business economies, not to mention the Colorado River’s impact on the 36 million people who rely on it for drinking water. Yet, for more than a decade Colorado and surrounding states have experienced unrelenting drought.


April 18, 2014--Front Range wants dibs on river water (Grand Junction Daily Sentinel)

A coalition of Front Range water utilities is calling in a letter for assurance that a new transmountain diversion project will be a part of a state plan aimed at filling the anticipated future gap between demand and supply. That desire by the Front Range Water Council is unsettling others who question whether the Western Slope has any more water left to give.


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