Colorado

***Public Input Sought for Colorado Water Plan!***

As an essential resource, water supports the open space provided by the state’s productive ranches and farms, brings us recreational activities such as boating and fishing, is the source of high quality drinking water for our growing towns and cities, and provides life to the beautiful environment that surrounds us. 


Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


November 27, 2014--Telluride joins national effort to curb climate change (Telluride Daily Planet)

The Town of Telluride joined a group of ski towns, ski companies and professional skiers and snowboarders in presenting a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency urging the federal regulatory agency to take action to curb power plant emissions.


November 26, 2014--Five cities where ‘natural infrastructure’ improved the water supply (Next City)

Where does your city’s water come from? The question is simple but, as with food or energy, many of us don’t know the answer. Beyond faucets, pipes and municipal treatment facilities, the average H2O consumer probably isn’t aware of all the rivers and lakes that form her vast watershed.


November 26, 2014--Statewide water plan taking shape (Pine River Times)

Prospects are for the state's population to double by 2050, while the state's water supply does not increase - and it could even decrease with climate change. That's driving creation of the Colorado Water Plan, which was initiated in May 2013 by an executive order from Gov. John Hickenlooper.


November 23, 2014--Regional officials skeptical as draft of water plan emerges (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Colorado’s first stab at a statewide water plan makes no direct call for a new transmountain diversion of West Slope water to the Front Range. That doesn’t mean West Slope water is off the table, though, said observers and a member of the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Far from it.


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