Climate Change

July 16, 2014--White House unveils climate change initiatives (New York Times)

President Obama will announce a series of climate change initiatives on Wednesday aimed at guarding the electricity supply; improving local planning for flooding, coastal erosion and storm surges; and better predicting landslide risks as sea levels rise and storms and droughts intensify.


July 16, 2014--State officials push for water conservation as climate change threatens (International Business Times)

California regulators are expected to pass the first-ever emergency water restrictions for the entire state. The rules, if passed, will levy fines of up to $500 a day on Californians who over-water their yards or hose down sidewalks and driveways. Scientists aren’t certain whether the now three-year-long drought is a direct result of climate change.


July 16, 2014--Grasshopper plagues: agricultural nightmare or ecological boon? (High Country News)

In early June, meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were puzzled: There was a big splotch on the radar that didn’t look like any weather system they’d ever seen. Maybe their software had a bug? Turns out, the dark green blob hovering over Albuquerque wasn’t a software glitch at all but a giant swarm of grasshoppers.


July 15, 2014--Drought conditions linked to human activity (Environmental News Network)

US Government scientists have developed a new high-resolution climate model that shows southwestern Australia's long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in manmade greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion.


July 14, 2014--8 charts that show how climate change is making the world more dangerous (The Guardian)

Forget the future. The world already is nearly five times as dangerous and disaster prone as it was in the 1970s, because of the increasing risks brought by climate change, according to a new report from the World Meteorological Organization. The first decade of the 21st century saw 3,496 natural disasters from floods, storms, droughts and heat waves.


July 14, 2014--The water-energy nexus could become a collision in a warming world (High Country News)

If you thought fracking was a water-guzzling and violent way to get the oil and gas flowing from shale, then you should check out oil shale* retorting. Earlier this month, details were made public regarding an oil shale project Chevron proposes for western Colorado. Of particular note was the amount of energy and water it will take to produce 100,000 barrels of oil per day.


July 12, 2014--Lake Mead watch: At lowest levels since 1937 (High Country News)

For almost two decades, the white band of mineral deposits circling Arizona’s Lake Mead like a bathtub ring, has grown steadily taller, a sign that America’s largest manmade water source is in deep trouble. This week it fell to its lowest level since 1937, when Hoover Dam was completed and the reservoir filled.


July 11, 2014--Loss of snowpack and glaciers in rockies poses water threat (Environment 360)

When Rocky Mountain explorer Walter Wilcox hiked up to Bow Summit in Canada’s Banff National Park in 1896, he took a photo of a turquoise lake that later caught the eye of a National Geographic magazine editor. In the photo, which was eventually published, the glacier feeding the lake was just a mile upstream.


July 6, 2014--Lake Mead drains to record low as Western drought deepens (Circle of Blue)

Lake Mead — America’s largest reservoir, Las Vegas’ main water source, and an important indicator for water supplies in the Southwest — will fall this week to its lowest level since 1937 when the manmade lake was first being filled, according to forecasts from the federal Bureau of Reclamation.


July 5, 2014--Pay heed to water use in climate change mitigation: Experts (Climate Change Journal)

Besides cutting greenhouse gas emissions, technology, policies or plans that aim to slow down climate change should also take environmental factors such as water usage into account, say researchers. A more integrated approach might make some options considerably more attractive than others, said Philip Wallis from Monash University in Australia.


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