Central Arizona Project

June 22, 2016--How Arizona fends off threats to its water (Cortez Journal)

In 1980, Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt helped a water revolution blossom amid the state’s unnaturally verdant lawns by signing the Groundwater Management Act, which mandated that communities pump no more water from aquifers than they put back in.

June 18, 2016--Does Arizona have enough water for the drought? (Arizona Magazine)

Although Arizona may not collectively be singing in the rain, some comfort can be had in knowing that water has been conserved with calculated intention. In fact, in Arizona State University’s 2011 “Watering the Sun Corridor” r

June 10, 2016--Collaborating to protect Lake Mead (Arizona Capitol Times)

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) and the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) recently hosted a second Colorado River Shortage Update. CAP and ADWR presented the latest information about the near-term outlook for the river and how Arizona can keep the river out of shortage in 2017.

April 10, 2016--Colorado River runoff forecast keeps dropping (Arizona Daily Star)

Drought continues to put the squeeze on the Southwest’s water supplies, with Colorado River runoff forecasts declining for the second straight month. The April-July forecast for Colorado River runoff into Lake Powell is 74 percent of average, down from 80 percent in early March.

March 18, 2016--EPA, US Bureau of Reclamation and Western water districts collaborate on ICP (Hydrocarbon Engineering)

Three of the West’s largest municipal water agencies have partnered with federal agencies to kick off the latest round of an expanded competitive grant programme aimed at discovering the next generation of water saving devices and technologies. For the first time, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is participating with the US Bureau of Reclamation, as well as the Central A

June 29, 2015--Lake Mead decline below 1,075 feet is symbolic (Tucson.com)

If New Year’s Day had happened last week, the Central Arizona Project would have suffered the first water shortage in its 35-year history. That’s because Lake Mead — where CAP water is stored at the Nevada border — dropped below 1,075 feet elevation late Tuesday, and stayed that way off and on the rest of the week. That’s the level at which the federal go

May 18, 2015--Feds project Lake Mead below drought trigger point in 2017 (ABC News)

Federal water managers released a report Monday projecting that Lake Mead's water levels will fall below a point in January 2017 that would force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. The effects could be serious. Arizona's allocation of Colorado River water could be cut 11.4 percent, or by an amount normally used by more than 600,000 homes.

April 24, 2015--Colorado River water shortage: Rural areas would be hit harder than cities (Casa Grande Dispatch)

Arizona’s communities, industries, mines and Native American tribes aren’t likely to be affected during the next five years if federal officials declare a shortage on the Colorado River, officials said Wednesday.

March 23, 2015--Innovative thinking spurs water deal (Arizona Central)

As part of a deal approved by the Arizona Corporation Commission, the private company, Liberty Utilities, will recharge about 78 billion gallons of treated effluent into the West Valley's aquifer.

January 29, 2015--CAP official: 61 percent chance of Colorado River shortage by 2017 (Cronkite News)

There is a 61 percent chance of the U.S. Interior Department declaring a shortage on the lower Colorado River by 2017, a Central Arizona Project official told state lawmakers Thursday.

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