Gold King Mine

May 17, 2016--EPA gives La Plata County a check for another $63,000 (Durango Herald)

In the ongoing quest that is pursuing reimbursement from the Environmental Protection Agency for Gold King Mine spill expenses, another $63,406 is coming to La Plata County. The funds are allocated to “direct expenses” related to the spill. “The good news is that we have $63,000 more than we had yesterday,” County Commissioner Julie Westendorff said.


May 17, 2016--What can the American Dipper tell us about the Animas River? (Durango Herald)

It was John Muir’s favorite bird. “He is the mountain streams’ own darling, the humming-bird of blooming waters, loving rocky ripple-slopes and sheets of foam as a bee loves flowers, as a lark loves sunshine and meadows,” he wrote in 1894. On and off for 30 years, Muir, regarded as America’s most influential naturalist, noted the American


May 10, 2016--Silverton’s Gold King reckoning (High Country News)

On the morning of Aug. 5, 2015, a deep pool of acidic, metal-laden water was backed up behind debris in the Level 7 adit of the Gold King Mine on the slope of Bonita Peak, roughly 10 miles north of Silverton, Colorado.


May 4, 2016--Senators formally request criminal probe of Gold King Mine spill (Denver Post)

Two Republican senators on Tuesday formally requested a federal criminal probe of the Gold King Mine spill, saying enough evidence exists to suggest laws might have been broken in the August disaster. John McCain, R-Ariz., and John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said in a letter to U.S.


April 29, 2016--Superfund management team lays out plans for 2016 (Durango Herald)

Environmental Protection Agency officials say by next month they intend to provide La Plata and San Juan counties a list of tasks it expects to complete in 2016 at the proposed Bonita Peak Mining District Superfund site. “Next month, we could provide a more comprehensive briefing on 2016 activities, where we will collect data and figure out what questions that data will ans


April 28, 2016--EPA: La Plata County won’t get full reimbursement for Gold King (Durango Herald)

Environmental Protection Agency officials told dismayed La Plata County commissioners on Wednesday not to expect compensation for some Gold King Mine spill costs. For seven months, county staff has sunk several hundred hours into drafting a cooperative agreement asking the EPA to fund up to $2.4 million over 10 years for spill-related costs and preparation measures for future emergencies.&


April 27, 2016--Cadmium, lead, copper levels in Animas headwaters exceed Colorado limits (Denver Post)

Animas River headwaters contamination exceeds state standards for cadmium, copper, lead and other toxic acid metals draining from inactive mines, officials from the Environmental Protection Agency and Sunnyside Gold Corp. revealed Tuesday. Until now, federal pronouncements after the EPA-triggered Aug.


April 26, 2016--Colorado senate passes abandoned mines cleanup bill (US)

Colorado’s Department of Natural Resources will soon be able to respond to emergency situations at more of the state’s abandoned mines. The Senate approved a bill Monday that allows the department to tackle situations threatening public safety or the environment at nearly any mine site. DNR’s Division of Reclamation, Mining and Safety had been limited to si


April 25, 2016--EPA is coming to town (Durango Herald)

All this week, the Environmental Protection Agency will be dropping in on public meetings in communities affected by the Gold King Mine spill, providing an update on the recently declared Superfund district north of Silverton. At 3 p.m.


EPA Releases Monitoring Plan for Animas and San Juan Rivers

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) released its final monitoring plan for the Animas and San Juan rivers following the August 5, 2015 Gold King Mine incident. They also posted on their Gold King Mine website the results of surface water and sediment sampling collected as part of their yearlong effort to gather scientific data to evaluate ongoing river conditions, as well as impacts to public health and the environment.


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