California

July 19, 2014--Drought pushing water prices to record levels (Times Herald)

Rumors drifted across the parched Central Valley that a bidding war for water might push auction prices as high as $3,000 an acre-foot, up from $60 in a normal year. Yet, Ray Flanders needed water to keep his orchards alive.


July 18, 2014--Drought is catalyst to reforming how we deliver water to Americans (Denver Business Journal)

For many people, news coverage of drought, low water tables, and increased pumping of aquifers are just words. The average American lacks full understanding of how the drought in the Western states affects them and the businesses they patronize.


July 16, 2014--The invisible high price of your little bottle of water (Los Angeles Times)

The oil used to make the plastic for all those bottles of water each year could fuel 1.3 million cars. Plastic bottles are shipped to Fiji to be filled, then shipped to us. A crazy way to get a drink of water. Bottled water is usually a waste of money and, beyond that, an environmental mess.

July 16, 2014--State officials push for water conservation as climate change threatens (International Business Times)

California regulators are expected to pass the first-ever emergency water restrictions for the entire state. The rules, if passed, will levy fines of up to $500 a day on Californians who over-water their yards or hose down sidewalks and driveways. Scientists aren’t certain whether the now three-year-long drought is a direct result of climate change.


July 16, 2014--California agriculture industry facing $1 billion in drought losses (Los Angeles Times)

California’s agricultural industry is facing $1 billion in lost revenue this year from the state’s worst drought in decades and could pay about $500 million for additional groundwater pumping, a new study said.


July 15, 2014--California drought threatens to dry up farm wells (Washington Post)

Researchers say farmers in pockets of California hardest hit by the drought could begin to see wells run dry next year. The Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, released the study Tuesday on the possible impact if the next two years remain dry in California.


July 14, 2014--The past and future of California's water (Scientific American)

The 20th century dawned with both excitement and concern for the water future of California and the rapidly growing but arid American West. Gold fever was receding, urban populations were burgeoning, and tentative efforts at modern, irrigated agriculture were expanding.


July 13, 2014--Another view: Busting water conservation myths (Sacramento Bee)

As a solution for California’s complex water challenges, conserving water to get more from every drop stands out for its great potential and the misconceptions around it.


July 6, 2014--Water transfers: Wrong and wasteful? (Appeal Democrat)

Year after year, Sacramento Valley groundwater is pumped out to replace surface water being sent south. It's been called an amoral practice and an unnecessary strain on a resource that is being depleted. It's said the impacts are being swept under the rug so big business agriculture in the south can stay afloat during the drought.


California Could Save Up to 14 Million Acre-Feet of Water

According to a new analysis released by the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council, California could be saving up to 14 million acre-feet of untapped water--providing more than the amount of water used in all of California’s cities in one year--with an aggressive statewide effort to use water-saving practices, reuse water, and capture lost stormwater. “Our current approach to water use is unsustainable, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t enough water to meet our needs,” said Kate Poole, NRDC senior attorney with the water program. “At a time when every drop counts, we need to employ sensible and cost-effective 21st century solutions that will help us reduce uses today while promising new, resilient supplies for cities and farms tomorrow.” “As climate change brings more extreme weather, including droughts, ramping up forward-thinking solutions now will help us be more resilient,” said Peter Gleick (pictured right), president of the Pacific Institute.


Syndicate content