Archive

August 17th, 2016

August 19, 2016--Rio water pollution reflects global crisis (Guardian)

The heavily contaminated waters of Rio don’t only put at risk the health of Olympians (Report, 3 August), they adversely affect the millions of people facing this faecal nightmare day in and day out. Despite Brazil being an upper-middle income country,


August 18, 2016--Sewage plant will require $62 million loan (Durango Herald)

The city plans to take out a $62 million loan this month to pay for a sewage-treatment plant remodel in Santa Rita Park. Work at the plant is expected to start in May, and it will require about two years, said consultant Bob Bolton, a vice president with Dewberry. Work on aeration basins will be accelerated to meet the February 2018 deadline to remove more nutrients such as nit


August 17, 2016--McPhee managers concerned about mussel invasion (Cortez Journal)

A non-native mussel species that is causing havoc in reservoirs across the nation has not yet infiltrated McPhee Reservoir, and local managers want to keep it that way. If the dreaded quagga mussel – which has contaminated nearby Lake Powell – migrates here, it would put the region’s main water source in jeopardy, said Mike Preston, general manager for the Dol


August 16th

August 15th

August 15, 2016--Groundwater recharge in Upper Colorado River Basin may hold steady under climate change (USGS)

Future groundwater replenishment in the Upper Colorado River Basin may benefit from projected increases in future basin-wide precipitation under current climate projections, according to a recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation. The Colorado River provides water for more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico.


August 14, 2016--Study: Drought like 2000-2006 would empty Lake Powell (Aspen Daily News)

From his office along the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, Eric Kuhn can see the bottom of Lake Powell. Kuhn, the general manager of the Colorado River District, has been working for months on a study asking if future droughts will drop water levels in Lake Powell so low that Glen Canyon Dam won’t be able to produce hydropower or release enough water to meet downstream demands.&nb


August 12th

August 13, 2016--Discoloration in Animas River no cause for alarm (Durango Herald)

With snowmelt all but complete and monsoons in full swing, residents can expect periodic discoloration of the Animas River, a public health official said Thursday. The river appeared orangish in color Thursday near Baker’s Bridge, according to a bicyclist who rode by and took notice.


August 12, 2016--Construction in Animas River to start Monday (Durango Herald)

This week, crews will start putting up fencing and traffic-control barriers, the city’s schedule said. Residents may also see crews moving boulders into a storage area near the construction site, Utilities Director Steve Salka said. The city is going to build rock weirs to help correct the flow of the river because it is shifting away from the city’s water intake, Salka sa


August 11th

August 11, 2016--Navajo Nation plans geothermal greenhouse fuelled by mine water (GeoEnergy)

The Navajo Nation, an indigenous group in New Mexico, could soon see the development of a geothermal greenhouse. In partnership with Colorado University it is hoped that the project could utilise a geothermal resources from a a coal mine bought by the Navajo Nation from international coal company BHP in late 2012.


August 10, 2016--Law lets Coloradans collect, use rainwater (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Vicki Felmlee is happy that the law has finally caught up with her. Like a lot of Coloradans, the longtime Grand Junction resident has been breaking the law for years by using rain barrels to collect water from her rooftop. That all changed Wednesday when Colorado became the last state in the nation to legalize them. “I haven’t been known for armed robbery, bribery or