September 13th, 2016

September 12, 2016--When do we stop calling what’s happening on the Colorado River “shortage”? (Ink Stain)

Putting together a lecture for University of New Mexico Water Resources Program students tomorrow, I’ve been thinking about this quote from MWD’s Bill Hasencamp, in last week’s LA Times:

September 10, 2016--New Mexico water officials eye pipeline to Colorado lake (Farmington Times)

A water commission is eyeing a possible pipeline from a Colorado lake to northern New Mexico. The Daily Times reports San Juan Water Commission members will meet in October to weigh having the pipeline designed at an estimated cost of $10,000 to $15,000. Further study could cost up to $250,000. Lake Nighthorse in southern Colorado is managed by the Bureau of Reclamation. The

September 9th

September 9, 2016--Dammed if you do: Scientists recommend strategies to reduce environmental damage from dams (News Wise)

Dams around the world provide critical water supplies and hydropower to growing communities and hundreds of new dams are proposed for developing economies.

September 9, 2016--Mancos water district continues reservoir title transfer (Cortez Journal)

This summer, the Mancos Water Conservancy District has continued investigating a possible title transfer for the Jackson Gulch Project, Superintendent Gary Kennedy said Wednesday. The district has been pursuing a transfer of ownership from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, so that the district could be the sole owner of the reservoir project.

September 8, 2016--Colorado town on verge of big changes amid Superfund cleanup (ABC News)

A historic Colorado mountain town is on the threshold of a transformation after the federal government announced it will embark on an ambitious campaign to stanch the flow of acidic wastewater cascading from abandoned mines. The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday designated an area north of Silverton as a Superfund site, clearing the way for a multimillion-dollar cleanu

September 7th

September 7, 2016--The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety (Los Angeles Times)

A reckoning arrives every August for the Colorado River and the 40 million people across the West who depend on it. After water managers measure annual inflows and outflows and do their best to estimate future precipitation in places as far-flung as northwestern Wyoming and southwestern New Mexico, they make a pronouncement that once was arcane but has become increasingly prominent —

September 6, 2016--Colorado’s water engineer discusses wasting of state’s precious resource (Aspen Daily Times)

Dick Wolfe, Colorado’s state water engineer, told a group of irrigators here last week that it’s illegal for someone to take more water than they need because they are speculating on the future potential value of their water rights. Wolfe was one of several guest speakers at the Uncompahgre Valley Water Forum, which was held on Sept.

September 5th

September 5, 2016--Fed's back off from Lake Mead water demand (

It sounded too good to be true — an official forecast that 2016 water use in Arizona, California and Nevada will be the lowest since 1992. That forecast from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation was too good to be true — by the bureau’s own admission. It was widely reported recently as a sign of major progress toward conservation.

September 4, 2016--Auction opens window on buy-and-dry practices (Post Independent)

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value. Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water.