Archive

July 7th, 2016

July 7, 2016--Colorado funding cuts make reservoirs more vulnerable to invasive species (Summit Daily)

While state funding has started drying up, a noted disturbance remains quite fluid. Two problematic varieties of freshwater shellfish — the zebra and quagga mussel — are always of concern at area water bodies where they are an aquatic nuisance species, or ANS.


July 6th

July 6, 2016--RRCC offers degree in water quality management (Lakewood Sentinel)

This fall, Red Rocks Community College makes Colorado history by offering a bachelor of applied science degree in water quality management technology. Red Rocks is the first community college in the state to offer a BAS degree, the result oftwo years of work by college faculty. “The accreditation to offer a BAS will expand the learning opportunities for the students,” said


July 6, 2016--Droughts of the future will not be the droughts of the past (USGS)

Due to its prevalence and implications for humans, wildlife, and ecosystems, drought is a focal research theme of the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC). From December 7-8, 2015, twenty-eight scientists, managers, and communicators gathered in Fort Collins, CO to discuss and synthesize the existing knowledge of climate change and ecological drought across the North Central region.


July 5th

July 5, 2016--Why a half-degree temperature rise is a big deal (NASA)

The Paris Agreement, which delegates from 196 countries hammered out in December 2015, calls for holding the ongoing rise in global average temperature to “well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels,” while “pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C.” How much difference could that half-degree of wiggle room (or 0.9 degree on the Fahrenheit sc


July 4, 2016--Agriculture community also affected by oil and gas slowdown (Greeley Tribune)

When the South Platte River flows high, Chuck Sylvester doesn’t get nervous. He grew up on the river. His family’s farm has been in LaSalle for 150 years. High water, low water — he’s seen it all more times than he can count. But he’s only seen the water rise higher than the doorknob of his garage once.


July 4th

July 3, 2016--Vail Daily column: Use it or lose it? (Vail Daily)

The “use it or lose it” feature of Colorado water law is often blamed for discouraging farmers and ranchers from taking efficiency and conservation measures that could benefit the environment or ease the supply and demand imbalance on the Colorado River.


July 1st

July 2, 2016--18 million people served by systems with lead violations (Water Online)

Public officials have often failed to step in when water systems violate the federal Lead and Copper Rule, according to a report released this week by the advocacy group Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) on the “extraordinary geographic scope” of lead contamination. “In 2015, 18 million people were served by water systems with lead violations.


July 1, 2016--Upper Animas River: A whitewater hidden gem (Durango Herald)

“I dare you to find a cooler trip,” Doug Ponce, a senior guide with Mountain Waters Rafting, challenged his customers before hitting the revered, if not notorious, rapids of the Upper Animas River. And he might be right. Just to reach the runnable stretch of the Upper Animas is an adventure, requiring those seeking a thrill to hop aboard the Durango & Silve


June 29th

June 30, 2016--Agricultural reuse projects offer a glimpse into the future of water (Water Online)

While consumers are still coming around to the idea of drinking recycled water, there have been far fewer ideological obstacles standing in the way of water reuse for non-potable purposes.


June 29, 2016--Forest Service restores wetlands in Falls Creek (Durango Herald)

The U.S. Forest Service has put the final touches on a project that effectively restores an almost 20-acre wetland in Falls Creek, adding a rich biodiverse area to the lush green valley northwest of Durango. “The life wetlands support are phenomenal,” said district ranger Matt Janowiak.