Archive

September 24th, 2014

September 21, 2014--Hermosa Creek watershed bill changes rankle locals that crafted the original bill (Coyote Gulch)

From the San Juan Citizens Alliance: The House Committee on Natural Resources failed today to honor the community consensus on the protection of the Hermosa Creek watershed that was fashioned by diverse stakeholders over many years.


September 21, 2014--Water-plan team seeks support (Durango Herald)

When a resident of the arid southwest corner of La Plata County once said he drove seven miles to a community spring for potable water, the response of water-issues pioneer Fred Kroeger was: “That’s closer than drilling (a well).” Kroeger’s dry humor pointed to reality – water in southwest La Plata County is scarce, wells are unreli


September 19th

September 19, 2014--Western U.S. governors begin drought discussions (Circle of Blue)

In the midst of a record-smashing dry cycle in the United States, the organization with the most influence over state and federal drought policy wants to do a better job managing the crisis. The need is evident. New research indicates that current state drought plans are inadequate for the task.


September 19, 2014--How the hot and dry West is killing Rocky Mountain forests (High Country News)

Severe fires, unprecedented bark beetle infestations, heat and drought – all exacerbated by climate change – are killing trees throughout the Rocky Mountains. So whether you’re a fan of New Mexico’s piñon pines, Colorado’s aspens or Montana’s whitebark pines, the West’s forests could look radically different in 50 to 100 years.


September 18, 2014--World water crisis 'unconscionable' speaker says (Illinoisan)

There’s a good chance you showered this morning, and brushed your teeth and flushed the toilet without giving much mind to the water with which we are blessed. But around the world in developing nations, there are 748 million people without safe drinking water everyday. There are 2.5 million people living without an appropriate place to go to the bathroom.


September 18, 2014--With close to average runoff, Lake Mead holds its own in late summer (Rocky Mountain PBS)

Lake Mead, the vast reservoir behind iconic Hoover Dam outside Las Vegas, is holding its own in later summer, after plummeting in July past levels not seen since it first filled in the 1930s. The surface elevation of Lake Mead reached the historic low of  1,081.75 feet above sea level during the week of July 7, according to the Bureau of Reclamation. On Aug.


September 18, 2014--Urban, agricultural communities clash over Colorado Water Plan (Greeley Tribune)

By 2050, projections place Northern Colorado’s population at double its current level — a forecast that threatens to not only challenge but possibly tap out the region’s water resources. In the South Platte Water Basin, a 22,000-square mile district including Weld County, this population boom could equate to major water shortages in the not-so-distant future.


September 18, 2014--Hermosa protection bill hits rough water (Durango Herald)

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton recently released a potential amendment to the Hermosa Creek Watershed Protection Act, changing the House bill from the agreed-upon wording drafted by community consensus. The original bill had the support of La Plata and San Juan counties, and had been carefully crafted by people who live there.


September 18, 2014--Local groups rehab Dolores River (Dolores Star)

Trout Unlimited and The Nature Conservancy are working to improve fish habitat and riparian health on the upper and lower Dolores River. Matt Clark, director for the Dolores River Chapter of Trout Unlimited, is organizing a project to install a fish passage and improved diversion dam at the Redburn Ranch north of Dolores.