Archive

October 17th, 2016

October 15, 2016--Is using less water the secret to cutting our greenhouse gas emissions? (Guardian)

When most of us think of slowing global warming, we think of reducing car exhaust and power plant emissions – limiting activities that involve combusting fossil fuels.


October 14, 2016--New study suggests water conservation remains the cheapest alternative (Ink Stain)

A new study published last week by Heather Cooley and colleagues at the Pacific Institute concludes that water conservation remains the cheapest water supply alternative as compared to the big new sources widely discussed, things like storm water capture, desalination, and recycling/reuse.


October 13, 2016--Planning for drought; pilot program pays users for water conservation (St. George News)

Water managers are testing the effectiveness of temporary, voluntary measures that could be used to keep the water level in Lake Powell above what is needed to maintain power production at the Glen Canyon Dam. The Utah Division of Water Resources and the Upper Colorado River Commission are overseeing the “Pilot System Water Conservation Program,” which has been extend


October 12, 2016--Protecting our Colorado River (Morning Consult)

Water makes the West as we know it. Congressman Wayne Aspinall put it best: In the West, when you touch water, you touch everything.


October 11th

October 11, 2016--Single clothes wash may release 700,000 microplastic fibres, study finds (Guardian)

Each cycle of a washing machine could release more than 700,000 microscopic plastic fibres into the environment, according to a study. A team at Plymouth University in the UK spent 12 months analysing what happened when a number of synthetic materials were washed at different temperatures in domestic washing machines, using different combinations of detergents, to quantify the microfibres


October 10, 2016--Nevada caves illuminate past climate, future challenges in the Southwest (Las Vegas Sun)

On a trip to Great Basin National Park, UNLV geoscience professor Matt Lachniet says that rainfall many millennia ago formed lakes in the desolate basins lining this strip of rural highway.


October 9, 2016--Environmentalists dismayed by Glen Canyon Dam management plan (AZ Daily Sun)

Environmental groups are criticizing the final draft of a plan released by the Bureau of Reclamation Friday to manage the operations of Glen Canyon Dam for the next 20 years. The plan&


October 8th

October 8, 2016--Bridging science and policy for better water strategies--Part 3 (Arizona State University)

It's 118 at Lake Mead on a July afternoon, but the thermometer on the boat’s depth finder says the lake is a cool 67 degrees. Naturally, you jump in. It tastes earthy and mossy, if mossy can be a taste, and ultimately it’s what 30 million people survive on. This is the stuff and place thousands of professionals are focused on.


October 7, 2016--EPA probes toxic Colorado mine tunnels, investigates possible harm to human health (Denver Post)

Sloshing knee-deep through acid orange muck in a dark mining tunnel, an EPA crew wearing air monitors and headlamps peered at a massive concrete plug, one of 13 installed in these cored-out mountains above Silverton. They are wrestling with the Environmental Protection Agency’s riskiest problem as post-Gold King disaster cleanup begins: whether to try to contain toxic mine


October 7th

Water Video: A Seuss-Like Tale

See Jeff Lukas' explanation of Colorado water in a clever, Seuss-Like video