Archive

November 25th, 2014

November 25, 2014--Water war amid Brazil drought leads to fight over puddles (Bloomberg)

Brazil’s Jaguari reservoir has fallen to its lowest level ever, laying bare measurement posts that jut from exposed earth like a line of dominoes. The nation’s two biggest cities are fighting for what little water is left. Sao Paulo state leaders want to tap Jaguari, which feeds Rio de Janeiro’s main source.


November 24, 2014--NM state engineer replaced (Daily Times)

A day after State Engineer Scott Verhines came to Bloomfield to answer questions about the Navajo Water Rights Settlement, Gov. Susana Martinez announced that he is being replaced Friday. "I really am shocked.


November 23, 2014--Some climate change impacts unavoidable: World Bank (Reuters)

Some future impacts of climate change, such as more extremes of heat and sea level rise, are unavoidable even if governments act fast to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the World Bank said on Sunday.


November 23, 2014--Record drought reveals stunning changes along Colorado River (National Geographic)

In early September, at the abandoned Piute Farms marina on a remote edge of southern Utah's Navajo reservation, we watched a ten-foot (three-meter) waterfall plunging off what used to be the end of the San Juan River. Until 1990, this point marked the smooth confluence of the river with Lake Powell, one of the largest reservoirs in the U.S.


November 23, 2014--Regional officials skeptical as draft of water plan emerges (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Colorado’s first stab at a statewide water plan makes no direct call for a new transmountain diversion of West Slope water to the Front Range. That doesn’t mean West Slope water is off the table, though, said observers and a member of the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Far from it.


November 22, 2014--Climate change threatens to strip the identity of Glacier National Park (New York Times)

What will they call Glacier National Park once the glaciers are gone? A century ago, this sweep of mountains on the Canadian border boasted some 150 ice sheets, many of them scores of feet thick, plastered across summits and tucked into rocky fissures high above parabolic valleys. Today, perhaps 25 survive.


November 22, 2014--Thinning projects would yield water (Payson Roundup)

Thinning Northern Arizona’s forests could increase runoff by 20 percent, which would restore streams, wetlands, springs and produce more water for Phoenix and other cities, according to a just-completed study by researchers from Northern Arizona Univer­sity.


November 22, 2014--Panel recommends $650 million Lake Mead project, rate hike (Las Vegas Journal)

A community advisory committee is recommending a new $650 million water project — and a rate hike to pay for it — to secure the Las Vegas Valley’s water supply even under a worst case scenario at Lake Mead.